Use Cases

Use Cases

Defined in this page are Use Case problems and resolutions.


Use Case I: Misuse of Data

Problem:
A scientist searching for data finds Heidelberg College's website. The scientist must then download over 20 Excel files. Upon completion of download, the scientist finds that the excel files do not display data properly. He spends several hours trying to sort through the data trying to find relevant data. Once it is found he must use third party tools to display the data in a format that is readable. Several hours are spent reformatting the data.

Use case problem further defined here.

Total time: 3-8 hours
10 minutes: Time spent locating data.
1-4 hours: Time spent extracting relevant data:.
2-4 hours: Time spent formatting data into useful information.

Solution:
A scientist searching for data finds a data resource on the WAWDA website. The resource links to an easy to visualize and configurable graph containing all the data the scientist needs.

Total time: 12 minutes
10 minutes: Time spent locating data.
1 minute: Time spent extracting relevant data:.
1 minute: Time spent formatting data into useful information.


Use Case II: Ease of Access to Data

Problem:
A family decides to visit Mentor Headlands for a day of recreational swimming. They are not sure of the water quality so they use Google to search for Mentor Headlands Beach. They find the website Ohio DNR Headlands Beach State Park website. The site has no direct information about current water quality. They do a search on the site and within a reasonable amount of time they do not find anything that tells them their is any problems with the water. They visit mentor headlands and find a warning sign that alerts them to an algae bloom. They see other people swimming and feel it is no threat. They spend 6 hours at the park have to leave after their four year old and dog both become sick with diarrhea and vomiting. Later that day, their dog dies and their child is rushed to the emergency room. When asked what happened, the child replies, "I was drinking the pretty water".

Resolution:
A family decides to visit Mentor Headlands for a day of recreational swimming. They are not sure of the water quality so they use Google to search for Mentor Headlands Beach.
1) They find the WAWDA site that lists information about water quality for Headlands Beach. WAWDA also gives some basic information and states that people or animals should not swallow water from the any lake that has a harmful algae bloom.
2) WAWDA has educated the Ohio DNR Parks website on the importance of displaying water quality information, and the Ohio DNR administrates a change to list water quality on all of their home pages.
3) WAWDA educates the USGS website admins how to display data so that it is interchangeable with other information systems. Focus of education is to request the use of WaterML, or at the very least displaying the data publicly in the form of a csv, json, xml or other web standard.


Use Case III: The Sick Fisherman

Problem:
A retired man decided to spend the day fishing. He does a search for "fishing on the Cuyahoga River" and finds the NPS website. He is unaware that the Harmful Algae Bloom on the surface can have any effect on the fish underneath the surface. He catches a decent size walleye, goes home cooks it and eats it for dinner. He spends the next few days with flu like symptoms. He marks it up to having the flu and resumes fishing the following weekend.

Solution:
WAWDA has educated the importance of displaying water alerts to the NPS website admins. A retired man does a search a search for "fishing on the Cuyahoga River" and finds that their is a Harmful Algae Bloom. Concerned about the bloom he would like to be notified when there is one. He is lead to the WAWDA website that manufactures a stand-alone device that sends alerts when their is public notice related to the bodies of water he uses. He never gets sick, and he loves to eat fresh walleye.